SGH/Deschler
Ten students participated in the Spring Grove School District competition of the National Geographic Bee on Friday. Shown in front, from left, are: Garrett Bergrud (2nd place), Isaac Griffin (champion) and Tristan Hammel (3rd place). In the second row are: Isaac Gengler, Reid Bjerke, Caden Grinde, Wyatt Spier, Jakob Myrah, Kennedy Bornholdt and Rachel Krenzke.
SGH/Deschler Ten students participated in the Spring Grove School District competition of the National Geographic Bee on Friday. Shown in front, from left, are: Garrett Bergrud (2nd place), Isaac Griffin (champion) and Tristan Hammel (3rd place). In the second row are: Isaac Gengler, Reid Bjerke, Caden Grinde, Wyatt Spier, Jakob Myrah, Kennedy Bornholdt and Rachel Krenzke.


Lakes, rivers, rain forests, seas, landmarks, mountain ranges and wild animals – having the knowledge of these geographical locations and information is very beneficial to the students competing in the National Geographic Bee.

On Friday, Jan. 27, 10 students at Spring Grove Public School tested their knowledge of geographical information.

After five questions in the tiebreaker championship round, eighth-grade student, Isaac Griffin, won the Spring Grove School competition of the National Geographic Bee. Placing second was fellow eighth grader, Garret Bergrud, and in third place was Tristan Hammel, also an eighth grader.

Participating in the Spring Grove School Geographic Bee were Garrett Bergrud, Reid Bjerke, Kennedy Bornholdt, Isaac Gengler, Isaac Griffin, Caden Grinde, Tristan Hammel, Rachel Krenzke, Wyatt Spier and Jakob Myrah.

These students earned their spots in the District Bee through classroom preliminary rounds – the top 10 students with the highest scores earned a position.

Thousands of schools throughout the United States and the five United States territories have been holding their own competitions in this first round of the 29th annual National Geographic Bee.

The next step is for all of the school champions to take a qualifying test to determine who participates in the next round. Up to 100 of the top scorers of that test in each state will then be eligible to compete in their State Bee on March 31.

The State Bee winners receive an all-expense paid trip from the National Geographic Society to Washington, D.C., for the national championship rounds in May.

The national champion will receive a $50,000 college scholarship, a lifetime membership in the society including a subscription to National Geographic magazine, and a trip to the Galapagos Islands.

The national finals will air on the National Geographic Channel on May 19 and on a later date on various public television stations.