SGH/Jordan Gerard
Second graders made school history by singing in ‘The Biggest Chorus in the World’ event on Thursday, March 9. The students sang Power in Me by 
Rebecca Lawrence with thousands of other elementary kids across the country at the same time.
SGH/Jordan Gerard Second graders made school history by singing in ‘The Biggest Chorus in the World’ event on Thursday, March 9. The students sang Power in Me by Rebecca Lawrence with thousands of other elementary kids across the country at the same time.
Last week, Spring Grove second graders sang a song simultaneously with thousands of other elementary students around the U.S.

Since it began in 1985, the “The Biggest Chorus in the World” is put on by the National Association for Music Education, and it takes place each year on the second Thursday in March at 1 p.m.

“It’s a simple idea, but a lot of people do it, which is really cool,” music teacher Bethany Engen said. “We know we’re all singing the same song at the exact same time.”

Originally, Engen planned to have students in kindergarten through sixth grade sing it altogether in the gym, but it would interfere with lunch times, so she had the second graders sing it during their scheduled music period.

This is the first year Spring Grove has participated in the sing-a-long.

The song this year was Power in Me by Rebecca Lawrence. The organization hosts several concerts in the northeastern U.S., but other schools can still participate in the event.

The teaching materials and soundtracks were available on the association’s website.

Classes started practicing the song about three weeks ago. All of the students in the elementary classes will sing the song at the close of their spring concert in May.

After the second graders sang that song, Engen told them they just sang along with other elementary students from all 50 states.

“Even from Alaska?” “Even from South Dakota?” students asked. When their teacher confirmed their questions, the kids were in awe.

After the sing-along, students shared what it meant to them. Responses were, “Keep trying,” and “Don’t give up.”

They also said it means to stand up for yourself and other people. More answers included, “Do your best,” and “We’re in charge of doing our best.”

“I think it connects them to other kids their age that also enjoy music,” Engen said. “It’s exciting to feel like you’re a part of something bigger than just your classroom.”