The bride’s children and their spouses served as the couple's attendants for Wayne and Tammie Bina’s wedding. They were dressed in various shades of purple. The wedding party was comprised of Tammie’s children, Crystal and Bradley Bries and Brian and Danielle York. SUBMITTED PHOTO
The bride’s children and their spouses served as the couple's attendants for Wayne and Tammie Bina’s wedding. They were dressed in various shades of purple. The wedding party was comprised of Tammie’s children, Crystal and Bradley Bries and Brian and Danielle York. SUBMITTED PHOTO
<
1
2
>
The hummingbirds and strawberries happened because Tammie and Wayne lit a Match.com.

And the Binas had a "Smurfing barn good time."

"Our cake topper had a female and male hummingbird on it, and they sat on strawberries because he (Wayne) likes strawberries. I also found a pansy plant, and my sister sugared the flowers for decorations for the cake," said Tammie York Bina, speaking of her Oct. 19 wedding to Wayne Bina.

The event was held at her parents' barn near Pilot Mound after the couple met on the dating website Match.com.

"Oh, and one of the highlights of the reception is that my mom set up a Smurfs wedding scene at one of the tables. We thought that was funny," Tammie added.

The Binas, now of Sparta, Wis., were joined in matrimony at the Richard and Winnie Unnasch farm last fall after finding one another quite electronically.

Tammie was recently divorced and had started a new life when each clicked on the other's Match profile and thought it might just work.

She stated that Wayne is "very considerate, very caring, very loving, is able to handle my disability and he loves me for who I am."

Wayne chose Tammie because he described her as "extremely nice and loving and very easy to talk to."

She recounted, "We got engaged on June 14 last year, but he'd actually proposed about a month before that. It was overwhelming because on top of that, I'd decided to sell my house, so I was getting my house ready to sell and planning a wedding at the same time."

The "very low-budget wedding" was to be a comfortable conversation between two families coming together from across Minnesota, Iowa and Wisconsin to celebrate the couple's marriage.

The preparations weren't a girls-only affair, as Wayne contributed to wedding planning throughout the process whenever he was asked for help - particularly in choosing what would be on the cake topper and what flavor cake he'd like to have. He also assisted with various details in the months, weeks and days leading up to the wedding.

Tammie had "the dress" taken care of as soon as she accepted Wayne's proposal. "I wore my mom's wedding dress. It's 46 years old and, for the most part, it fit. I made a few modifications," the bride explained. "Luckily, my cousin was able to help, so it cost only $100 to have it altered. She hand-stitched the ribbon at the waist so that if my sister wants to use it someday, she can change that. I had to take the hem down so that the dress was a little longer, and the hat...I modified the veil in front so that it came down past my nose. Wayne found his tie before he found his shirt, and we shopped online for dresses for the girls, and the guys had purple shirts."

The wedding party was comprised of Tammie's children, Crystal Bries and Brian York, and their respective spouses, Bradley Bries and Danielle York, and Crystal's son, Bryson, as ringbearer, and Tammie's sister Stena Lieb's daughter, Gwen, as flower girl.

The procession of attendants was clad in all different shades of purple and they convened at an arbor made from a vine found in a tree her father cut in Pilot Mound Township.

After 100 or more people witnessed them taking their vows, Tammie's brother arrived in the family "limousine" - a John Deere Gator - and took them for a ride from the barn to a settler's cabin on the property and back again. In the meantime, attendees took seats at tables set up in the barn and enjoyed a catered meal from the Silver Grille in Chatfield.

"We were going to just make the food ourselves, but we decided to have it catered, and that was awesome. We didn't have to worry about a thing," Tammie said.

The afternoon had started out as cold and wet, but shortly before the ceremony, a rainbow spread across the sky and forecasted a lovely evening, one where the children got to go outside and play, and the grownups got to stay in the barn and boogie down if they wanted to take advantage of the '70s and '80s tunes spun by Tom Schramm.

Tammie was pleased to see three of her high school classmates again, and at the end of the day, she was glad to be the new Mrs. Wayne Bina.

"Everything went off without any problems. We had a great time...we had friends and family here, and we had fun," she said.

Tammie related that the "second time around is very different" when she reflects on what marriage really can become.

"It's like going through a second childhood, sometimes. I think because I married so young and had kids right away, I missed out on a lot of the romance and companionship that came with being married," Tammie reflected. "That's stuff I didn't realize was there until I met him (Wayne). I can talk to him about anything, good or bad. We like to go for drives, go camping, enjoy each other's company, no matter where we're at."